A Quick But Satisfying Bite

I missed The Shallows when it was in theaters last year. I’d wanted to see it since it received good word-of-mouth and a decent Rotten Tomatoes rating in the mid-seventies. Jaws has been a favorite movie of mine since I first saw it in 1975, at the same time I was reading the book. Another one I enjoyed was Open Water, a film that effectively mined the primal terror engendered by sharks, and raked in $30 million on a budget of $120,000. I figured The Shallows would be in a similar vein. Now it’s come to Starz so I was able to catch it (you could say).

Working from a script by Anthony Jaswinski, Spanish director Jaume Collet-Serra has crafted a tight and focused movie. He’s done both horror and thrillers in the past, helming Orphan, Unknown, and Non-Stop. The Shallows has one main character and a handful of supporting roles, so the burden for making the film work is on Blake Lively. She’s on screen for almost every second of the film’s 86 minute running time. Think The Revenant in a warm climate.

Lively plays Nancy, a medical student who’s dealing with the loss of her mother. She’s gone in search of a special beach in Mexico that her mother had visited when she was Nancy’s age. With the help of Carlos (Oscar Jaenada) , Nancy finds the beach and then surfs the cove there with a couple of locals. She stays out when they leave to make a last run, but during it she’s attacked by a Great White that slashes open her thigh. Only 200 yards from shore, she finds herself in an ultimate fight for survival.

Collet-Serra follows the playbook that Spielberg accidentally wrote. Bruce, the mechanical shark of Jaws, malfunctioned so often it only makes brief appearances in the film, which increased the terror. With a CGI shark, there aren’t any of the problems that plagued Spielberg, but Collet-Serra still limits its appearances to a total of 4 minutes screen time. Instead the horror is communicated by a blossom of blood in the water, or Lively’s reaction to a would-be rescuer’s fate. (Collet-Serra does, though, give a short cut that rivals the dropping foot in Jaws.)

Lively demonstrated with Age of Adeline that she had the strength as an actor to hold a film. While she is a classic beauty who summons up memories of the classic Hollywood stars of the 1940s like Lauren Bacall or Veronica Lake, she matches those looks with intelligence and determination. In 1999, the James Bond film The World Is Not Enough featured Denise Richards cast as a nuclear scientist. It was truly painful to watch. Here, though, it’s no stretch to believe Lively as a medical student. She took the role partly because of her husband Ryan Reynolds’ similar minimalist film, 2010’s Buried. With one exception she did her own stunts throughout the movie. At one point late in the film she winds up with a bloody nose; that actually happened and it’s her blood. The exception: Lively didn’t know how to surf, even though she was born and raised in the San Fernando Valley of Los Angeles, just over the hills from Malibu. A professional was brought in for the scenes when she was actually surfing.

Much of the filming was done in a tank with green screen. For anyone who’s studied the filming of Jaws, you know open water filming can be deadly for a budget. It came close to scuttling Spielberg’s career before it ever got going. Collet-Serra, though, did some location filming along the Gold Coast of Australia, substituting for Mexico, and included actual footage in every green screen scene.

This taut film did well in the theaters, grossing over three times its budget. If you’re an aficionado of Discovery Channel’s Shark Week, or if you like thrillers that actually do thrill, make sure you check out this film.