A Lot More -Er

2016’s original Deadpool was a wonderful surprise – an R-rated movie from the Marvel canon that still made almost $800 million worldwide. On top of that, it was a critical hit. The success of Deadpool was sweet revenge for star and producer Ryan Reynolds. He’d always loved the character, but when he got the chance to play him in X-Men Origins: Wolverine, the movie turn the character into a bland, generic bad guy. (Really? The “Merc with a Mouth” with his mouth sealed shut? No one saw a problem with this?) However, there’s nothing that Hollywood likes more than a reboot, and Reynolds, assisted by first-time director Tim Miller, made a film that was faithful to the source material, including Deadpool’s 4th wall shattering dialogue. The film was essentially a Warner Brother’s cartoon with a stratospheric body count, but it also confirmed that an R rating wasn’t the kiss of box office death for a Marvel-sourced film, which was confirmed with last year’s Logan.

For almost a year and a half there have been teasers about the next film, so the anticipation built. What would Deadpool 2 be like? The answer turns out to be a lot more of everything in the first movie: funnier, cruder, wilder. If meta-ier was a word, the dictionary illustration would be a still from this film.

The directing duties for Deadpool 2 were handled by David Leitch, the former stuntman who gave a shot of adrenalin to the revenge flick with John Wick, then did the same for the Cold War spy film with Atomic Blonde. Here the action is just as well choreographed, though skewed to the side of black comedy. The central set piece of the film is in effect the live action version of a Roadrunner cartoon, though with lots of coyotes getting taken out along the way.

Reynolds’ Wade Wilson/Deadpool is not in a good place as the movie begins. An extended flashback shows what brings him to the point of despondency where he tries to blow himself into little pieces. Considering he can’t die, that doesn’t go as planned. Colossus (Stefan Kapicic) brings him to the Xavier School to recover. Once Wade’s somewhat fit again, Colossus and Negasonic Teenage Warhead (Brianna Hildebrand) bring him along on an emergency call. Russell Collins (Julian Dennison), a young mutant at an orphanage that doubles as a mutant reeducation center, has a meltdown and tries to kill the headmaster. Wade’s help turns a bad situation worse, and Collins kills one of the attendants. Both Collins and Wade are taken into custody by the authorities, who fit them with collars that suppress their powers and ship them to a super-max prison for mutants. But as they are settling in, a half-human/half-machine mercenary from the future named Cable (Josh Brolin) appears, looking to kill Collins.

Brolin is having a stupendous summer, with Deadpool 2 on track to beat the first movie at the box office, plus his performance as Thanos in Avengers: Infinity War which is currently in fourth place on the all-time box office list and will likely move up to 3, or possibly 2, before it’s done. His stoic visage is a beautiful counterfoil for Deadpool. While she doesn’t appear until midway through the film, Zazie Beetz, as the super-humanly lucky Domino, comes close to completely stealing the film.

If you enjoyed the original Deadpool, you’ll probably really like this new iteration. If you didn’t, you really won’t like this film’s extra-large helping of everything we got the first time around. I’m of the former category myself. But while the first movie expanded the possibilities for the superhero genre as a whole, Deadpool 2 shows the limitations of this series. This isn’t a character that will grow – his deep thoughts are usually cut off when he shoots someone. While the wider Marvel Universe has grown as its stories have deepened in resonance, Deadpool is a niche within that Universe. Reynolds and his collaborators have polished every surface until it shines, but if another film is made it will be more – probably a lot more – of the same. While it breaks the 4th wall, Deadpool 2 doesn’t break any of its boundaries.

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Third Time’s The Charm

I’ve often lamented that in a movie trilogy, the first one’s often good, the second’s better, and then the third turns out to be a load of crap. Superheroes are particularly at risk of this. After two decent films, the Christopher Reeve Superman series added Richard Pryor to the third movie and jumped the shark bigtime. Val Kilmer’s turn as Batman was a step down, with Jim Carrey and Tommy Lee Jones not just chewing the scenery but ripping it apart with their teeth. Tobey Maguire in Spider-man 3 actually made me cringe – twice! And then there’s X-Men: The Last Stand. It almost was for the series.

But the Wolverine movies have flipped the script. X-Men Origins: Wolverine was awful, though it did serve a purpose by so badly mauling Deadpool’s character that Ryan Reynolds had to make his own movie. 2013’s The Wolverine was better, though the ending was a mess. But now with Logan, the series has its strongest outing with Hugh Jackman’s last turn in the title role. It’s not the best superhero movie ever, but it’s really good, and Jackman gets to go out with a bang.

By 2029, the world of the X-Men has collapsed with most of the mutants gone after years without new mutant births. Those left hide in the substrata of society. Logan (Jackman) works as a limo driver, ferrying drunk bachelorette parties and rude businessmen around El Paso, Texas. He lives on the Mexican side of the border in a deserted factory with an enfeebled Charles Xavier (Patrick Stewart), whose once-all-powerful mind is breaking down, and the albino Caliban (Stephan Merchant), who nurses Charles while Logan works.

On a funeral job, Logan is approached by Gabriela (Elizabeth Rodriguez), seeking his help for a young girl, Laura (Dafne Keen). Gabriela wants to get Laura to North Dakota near the Canadian border, to a fabled sanctuary for mutants called Eden. She tells Logan that Laura is just like him, a description that’s soon confirmed. But Logan’s also approached by Pierce (Boyd Holbrook), a smooth-talking mercenary with a mechanical left forearm and hand. Pierce works for Dr. Rice (Richard E. Grant) and has been tasked with cleaning up a mess. Part of the mess is Laura.

As with The Wolverine, James Mangold directs. He also came up with the story and co-wrote the script with Michael Green, who’s currently bringing Neil Gaiman’s “American Gods” to Starz, and Scott Frank, who’d scripted The Wolverine and who also did Out of Sight, Get Shorty, and Minority Report. They keep the film tightly focused while the action flows like waves throughout the movie, building to the climax. One interesting aspect to the story is they’ve incorporated the comic book world into the plot, as if the comics were inspired by the real characters. It actually works.

Over the course of 17 years and 9 movies, Jackman’s Wolverine has become the iconic character in the X-Men series – an evaluation with which Deadpool would definitely agree. He’s always exciting to watch, even with his one-profane-line cameo in X-Men: First Class. Here though he plays a much more human and humane version of the character, facing mortality for the first time. Likewise, Patrick Stewart gets to play Professor Xavier as King Lear, betrayed not by family but by his own mind. As Laura, Dafne Keen is a fitting foil for Jackman. She’s the daughter of Will Keen, who’s mostly appeared on British TV series such as “Wolf Hall” (as Thomas Cranmer) and the recent Netflix hit “The Crown.” Laura is a key role to make the film work, and Keen owns it.

The production benefited by following in Deadpool’s wake, since that movie proved that a superhero film didn’t have to be constrained to fit a PG-13 rating. Logan earns its R rating with hard-edged action beyond what’s been seen in the X-Men franchise thus far. It’s not gratuitous but fits with the life-or-death stakes in the story.

Wolverine was Jackman’s first role outside of Australia, and it was only a scheduling conflict for the actor originally cast in the role, Dougray Scott, that allowed Jackman’s casting 3 weeks after shooting began. Now he’s conquered stage and screen (and Deadpool’s heart) and is a major star. It’s fitting that he gets to give a farewell performance in the role.

I’ve mentioned Deadpool several times during this review, partly because in a number of venues a teaser trailer for his next film is attached to Logan. It’s also on YouTube and can be viewed here. Minor spoiler: the scroll at the end is a book report on “The Old Man and the Sea” as written by Deadpool. Enjoy.