Three Star

By this point in the summer, explosions and car chases are often losing their appeal. It takes a special action movie to go beyond one week atop the box office (such as Guardians of the Galaxy – more on that in my next post). There’s a place for a movie that bucks the big budget trend, and The Hundred Foot Journey fills that slot nicely.

Very Important: if you’ve seen the trailer, you might think you already know what will happen. You may have decided this film is just a clone of Chocolat, especially since they share the same director, Lasse Hallstrom. Hallstrom, though, doesn’t make movies that fit assumptions. He also directed The Cider House Rules, Salmon Fishing in Yemen, and had his first international hit 30 years ago with My Life as a Dog. The Hundred Foot Journey is no exception.

The beauty of Hundred Foot is the character interaction. Helen Mirren is excellent – as always – as Madame Mallory, whose restaurant in a small French town possesses one Michelin star. She covets a second star, but she’s use to doing things in the traditional way. Of equal delight is watching actor Om Puri. He’s a pillar of the Indian film community with over 250 credits, though he’s only appeared in a few Western films, such as Charlie Wilson’s War, The Ghost and the Darkness, and Ghandi. Here he plays Papa, the head of the Kadam family, who have come to Europe after a tragedy in their native India. While there’s a comedic element to the character, he also presents Papa with dignity and pride.

The main characters, though, are Hassan (Manish Dayal) and Margeurite (Charlotte Le Bon). Dayal is from North Carolina, and has appeared in TV series such as “The Good Wife,” “Law and Order” (both “S.V.U.” and “Criminal Intent”), and the reboot of “90210.” This is his first starring role in a major picture. Le Bon, who is from Quebec, is more of an ingénue, with a couple of movies to her credit. It’s a joy to watch them on the screen.

The movie’s based on a novel by Richard C, Morais and was adapted by Steven Knight. Knight has an eclectic résumé, having done David Cronenberg’s thriller Eastern Promises, Dirty Pretty Things (which starred Audrey Tautou and Chiwetel Ejiofor), and Amazing Grace, which told the story of slavery abolitionist William Wilberforce. Recently he wrote the well-received Locke, starring Tom Hardy. Knight also created the original English version of “Who Wants to Be a Millionaire.” While the adaptation has plenty of humor, it is spiced with pathos and leavened with humanity.

Hallstrom is assisted by Linus Sandgren, whose cinematography infuses the film with the warmth of the southern French countryside. Sandgren’s mostly worked in his native Sweden, but last year he did the photography for the excellent American Hustle. The movie also boasts two major players in Hollywood as producers – Steven Spielberg and Oprah Winfrey – who know a bit about making quality films.

The Hundred Foot Journey chronicles the Kadam family’s long journey to find a new home, as well as Madame Mallory’s journey to understanding others. Sometimes, though we may think there are vast differences between ourselves and others, when we actually make the effort it isn’t such a long trip after all.

 

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